60 percent of Russians want communism back

 

About 60 percent of Russians believe there were more positive than negative aspects to life in the former Soviet Union, an opinion poll suggests.

Of the 1,000 people whom Russia’s Public Opinion Foundation (FOM) interviewed by telephone in a survey last month, 14 percent said the word communism had percent “very pleasant,” “positive” or “wonderful” connotations for them and 12 percent said they were nostalgic about the Soviet era.

Communism was just a thing of the past for 11 percent, but the same proportion believed communism meant good and stable life.

To 7 percent, the word communism gave a sense of “disgust” or “sad associations” or meant “something negative” generally.

For 5 percent, it stood for dreams of a “radiant future” that had never come true (“it’s a great pity that we never came to see it”).

Asked by pollsters to explain the meaning of the word communism, 23 percent said that for them it meant a just society where everyone is equal and all property is common.

For 9 percent, the word primarily stood for a specific economic and social system, while for 8 percent it represented a life better than today’s (“we were better off, people were taken better care of,” and “people were more plain and life was more plan as well”).

Six percent said communism represented good and stable life for them, and praised the official Soviet era principle “From each according to their abilities, to each according to their needs.”

Five percent dismissed communism as a utopia or fairytale.

Respondents were also asked to explain what they might see as positive and negative aspects of the Soviet system.

In response, 33 percent credited it with good social security guarantees, stability and good care of people, 14 percent said it had been a system of justice and social equality, 9 percent said the Soviet Union was a land of rule of law and discipline, 7 percent praised the country’s guaranteed employment, and another 7 percent claimed that people were more willing to help each other then than they are today.

On the other hand, 9 percent criticized Soviet-era restrictions on rights and liberties, 7 percent accused the Soviet system of suppressing personal individuality, another 7 percent said shortages of basic consumer goods were that system’s main defect, 6 percent slammed abuse of authority in that period and 5% condemned the repressive rule in the Soviet Union.

By and large, 59 percent of respondents believed there were more positive than negative aspects to communism. In that category, 69 percent were people aged 60 or more and 47 percent people aged between 18 and 30.

Moreover, 43 percent would have welcomed Russia’s re-adopting the communist ideology, 38 percent were not happy with the idea, and 19 percent were undecided on this point.

 

MORE…

http://rbth.ru/news/2013/10/12/about_60_percent_of_russians_see_communism_as_good_system_-_poll_30755.html

  14 comments for “60 percent of Russians want communism back

  1. October 14, 2013 at 3:08 am

    After the collapse of Soviet Union, I have got new and fresh thinking of Russian people.There are almost 60 percent communist in Nepal too.

    • shah_sarker@yahoo.com
      February 9, 2014 at 6:31 pm

      Jaya Karki,

      Do you belief Maoism?

  2. October 14, 2013 at 5:56 pm

    Oasis of socialism:

  3. yuvraj panthi
    October 15, 2013 at 3:53 am

    the news to be collected from like our country, Nepal. the news of communist of Nepal (Unified), a party of proletarian revolutionaries. our party is against feudalism, colonialism, imperialism and bureaucratic capitalism in our country and imperialist aggression worldwide. It supports revolution, workers and peasant struggle and any struggle against the domination in the world.

  4. yuvraj panthi
    October 15, 2013 at 3:55 am

    the news to be collected from like our country, Nepal. the news of communist party of Nepal (Unified), a party of proletarian revolutionaries. our party is against feudalism, colonialism, imperialism and bureaucratic capitalism in our country and imperialist aggression worldwide. It supports revolution, workers and peasant struggle and any struggle against the domination in the world.

  5. srirkishnan
    October 16, 2013 at 4:51 am

    Out of 60 percent people, how many of them are youngsters and how many of them are old people?

    • qwerty
      October 17, 2013 at 1:44 am

      It says in the post, just read it :P

      • knickerbockers
        November 3, 2013 at 2:57 am

        “In that category, 69 percent were people aged 60 or more and 47 percent people aged between 18 and 30″

        That’s not how math works…

        • November 16, 2013 at 6:37 pm

          You can see the article’s not the best translation, so it’s safe to assume the intended wording was 69% of old people & 47% of young people support this.

  6. Look!over there!
    October 18, 2013 at 12:21 am

    Only 1000 people interviewed? That is not enough at all.
    Why did Putin get like 60% of the presedential vote then?

    • jeffrey dean
      October 18, 2013 at 2:43 pm
      • Don Durito
        October 20, 2013 at 3:51 pm

        As long as some form of probability sampling was done (such as simple random sampling, or stratified random sampling), and done properly, a thousand respondents should be good enough. If the methodology was sound, the results will reflect, with a small margin of error, the population’s beliefs. I’d want to know a bit more about the methodology and the reputation of the organization that conducted the survey before jumping to too many conclusions.

Comments are closed.