How Colonialism Benefits from Boko Haram’s Mass Kidnapping of Girls

Christof Lehmann (nsnbc) : The mass kidnapping of Nigerian schoolgirls by Boko Haram is only the tip of on iceberg of slavery in Africa. Slavery and trafficking is more often than not tied to conflicts in which core NATO member states and terrorist organizations with ties to their intelligence services play central roles. Ultimately, conflict, slavery and trafficking, as well as prostitution are tied to issues about sovereignty. 

 

Turkey_MIT_THY_NIGERIA_SMUGGLING_WEAPONS_ADBoko Haram began its insurgency five years ago. Experts stress that Boko Haram is covertly funded and armed by intelligence services of core NATO member states. The function of the covert support for Boko Haram is the destabilization of a country to justify a NATO military presence.

One of the most recent incidents that supports this assessment comes from a clandestine recording of a phone conversation between Mustafa Varank, who has close ties to Tukey’s AKP government and Turkey’s intelligence service MIT and a Turkish Airlines official, in which the two are discussing details about arms smuggling to Nigeria.

Emma Christopher, an expert on slavery and human trafficking, stressed that tens of thousands of people are bought and sold in Nigeria every year. The majority of them are children. Christopher is referring to the International Labour Organization which estimated that in 2003, as many as six million Nigerian children had been trafficked at some time in their lives.

Nigeria InsurgencyCore NATO Members Engineered Conflict Drives Slave and Trafficking Business.

This prompts the questions, why the sudden outcry about the kidnapped Nigerian girls throughout western governments? Why the sudden headlines in western corporate media?

In October 2012, the Irish analyst Finian Cunningham pointed out Boko Haram’s role as an instrument of western modo-colonialism, writing:

On the surface, a militant group known as Boko Haram appears to be the protagonist. But some believe that powerful Western interests are using the violence to consolidate foreign control over Nigeria’s vast oil wealth.

Cunningham stressed that some Nigerian analysts believe that the organization is being used by powerful external forces as a conduit for destabilizing Nigeria. A “believe” which since then has been substantiated. He quoted political analyst Olufemi Ijebuode saying:

“The upshot of this latest massacre is to destabilize the state of Nigeria by sowing sectarian divisions among the population. The killers may have been Boko Haram operatives, but Boko Haram is a proxy organization working on behalf of foreign powers.” 

Note, that the rapid growth of the Nigerian economy and the country’s oil export coincides with the increased incidence of terrorist attacks and the increased presence of US AFRICOM troops.

MORE…

http://nsnbc.me/2014/05/12/how-colonialism-benefits-from-boko-harams-mass-kidnapping-of-girls/

  2 comments for “How Colonialism Benefits from Boko Haram’s Mass Kidnapping of Girls

  1. Christof Lehmann
    May 14, 2014 at 8:57 am

    ATT Editor of Systemiccapital.com.
    Not for publication.

    I appreciate your interest in my work and in our newspaper. We invite republication “if” we have a previous agreement, which we haven’t.

    We encourage the publication of “part” of our articles with a LINK .. read the full article on nsnbc international.

    I have to insist on this, NOT because I don’t appreciate what you are doing, but because what you are doing is actually taking readers and revenue away from a struggling independent newspaper and its contributors.

    Please be part of the SOLUTION instead of being part of the PROBLEM.

    Thank you very much for your understanding.

    Dr. Christof Lehmann
    Editor-in-Chief
    nsnbc international

    as well as author and copyright owner of this article.

  2. jeffrey dean
    May 14, 2014 at 1:08 pm

    I have cut a large part of the posting.

    FYI

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